Icelandic Goat: Characteristics, Use & Best 8 Farming Benefits

Icelandic Goat

About Icelandic Goat, Icelandic Goat is a breed of domestic goat that originated in Iceland. Icelandic Goat was created by crossbreeding Swedish and Norwegian goats with native Icelandic animals in the 1950s. The goats have distinctive coloration, white with black spots or black with white spots.

The main point we would like to mention is that Icelandic Goat has a distinctive coloration: white with black spots or black with white spots.

Characteristics

  • The Goat has intense black spots on its back and sides, with a white mark on the chest area of about seven, but some Icelandic Goats have no white mark on their chest.
  • The Goat has a very short tail for the breed, which is the short repining legs and narrow body.
  • The skin of these Goats is fairly thick and oily since this breed faces difficulties in the hot summer of Iceland.
  • The goat’s coat can be short and dense or long, coarse, and usually coated with an oily substance to protect it from the elements.
  • The goat has a longer and flatter face than other goat breeds and a characteristic curiosity: stretching out their necks over fences to reach a blade of grass that may have escaped their notice.
  • The Goat has a strong muscular body, the males are of average height, but they are the heaviest goats in the world.
  • The Goat has long back legs, a short neck, and a narrow head with short horns.
  • The Goat hooves are hard for traversing rocky terrain and digging into snow and ice for food during the winter months.
  • The female goat may start breeding by 5 months but is usually 6 or 7 months old when she first becomes pregnant.

The Appearance

Icelandic mother goats, as well as males, have distinctive coloration. The Icelandic goat is predominantly white with black spots or black with white spots, but sometimes the coat color can vary from light-brown to dark-brown.

The coat coloration is the unique characteristic of the Icelandic goat, most commonly cited as the difference between it and other breeds.

Origin

The Icelandic Goat originates in Iceland. They were developed from native Scandinavian goats crossed with the Swedish goat and Norwegian goat in the 1950s. It was originally created by crossbreeding Scandinavian goats with native Icelandic animals.

The first three imports to Iceland were a German/Danish tuxedo buck and two tuxedoes from Denmark in 1954. Tuxedo does were used in the development of this breed to cross with local brown, short-haired goats brought to Iceland by early settlers.

Quick Information about the Icelandic Goat

Breed nameIcelandic Goat
Group nameGoats
WeightMale weight 40-60 Kg, female weight 35-45 Kg
Life span10 to 15 years (In captivity)
TemperamentFriendly, easily tamed and may become very tame
ColorWhite with black spots or black with white spots

Uses

The Goat is domesticated and used in domestic goat milk production. They are also used in meat production.

The milk of the Goat has a fat content of 3%. Icelandic Goat is an efficient milk producer, so it can be considered a good milk producer for small farms.

The Goats are mostly kept for milk production. In the early 1950s, the first imports came from Denmark, Germany, and Sweden.

Farming Benefits of Icelandic Goat

1. The Goat is a productive breed producing a high quantity of milk and meat.

2. The Goat is tolerant to heat, which makes it suitable for summer grazing outside the snow and ice-covered country of Iceland.

3. The goats are hardy, disease resistant, and able to live off rough vegetation and on poor quality pasture in Iceland’s short, harsh winters.

4. Their regular taste for cold temperatures means they will survive the winter months better than other goats in much colder climes in Europe, Asia, or North America.

5. They eat grass but prefer a rich diet and can easily move from chaff to lush pasture in short periods.

6. The Goats are bred hardier than other types of goats and produce more milk for the same amount of work required to keep them happy and healthy.

7. They have a friendly nature, which makes them easy to handle and care for.

8. Icelandic is an animal that adapts and thrives in extreme weather conditions.

Special Notes

The Goat has a distinctive coloration: white with black spots or black with white spots. The Icelandic Goat is meat and milk-producing animal with distinctive coloration. Icelandic goats are very hardy animals.

The Goats are very hardy, disease resistant, and easily adapt to any climate. The Icelandic goat’s skin is fairly thick and oily since this breed faces difficulties in the hot summer of Iceland.

Conclusion

Icelandic Goats are mostly kept for milk production. Goat milk has a fat content of 3% and protein content of 4%. The milk of the Icelandic Goat is very popular in the local area.

The Goats are bred hardier than other goats and produce more milk for the same amount of work required to keep them happy and healthy. Thank you for reading my article.